News

Comment: Creating more American wind energy helps us keep promises

Source: By Tom Kiernan, Roberta Combs, Michele Combs, The Hill • Posted: Thursday, March 10th, 2016

When you turn your lights on at home, how often do you think about your family, your children or your children’s children? For more and more young families and young voters across the country, the answer is every single time. That’s because how we choose to produce the electricity needed to power America has a lasting impact on our health, our wallets and our jobs.
Air pollution still poses a threat to our families’ health every day. Power plants that contribute to this pollution are now more expensive and less efficient than the clean energy sources scaling up fast on America’s power grid. That means America’s electricity doesn’t have to hit U.S. families and homeowners in the pockets and the lungs.

Big Wyoming wind farm clears another government hurdle

Source: By MEAD GRUVER, Associated Press • Posted: Thursday, March 10th, 2016

One of the biggest wind projects under development in North America cleared another regulatory hurdle Wednesday with the release of a federal environmental study looking at the first-phase installation of 500 wind turbines. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management’s environmental analysis tentatively allows planning for the Chokecherry-Sierra Madre wind project south of Rawlins to continue. The agency found no new problems after looking at exactly where the developers propose to put the turbines.

Obama admin OKs turbine siting for huge Wyo. wind project

Source: Scott Streater, E&E reporter • Posted: Thursday, March 10th, 2016

The Obama administration gave preliminary approval yesterday for siting the first 500 turbines in a southeast Wyoming project that’s projected to become one of the world’s largest wind farms. At issue is the Bureau of Land Management’s release of an environmental assessment (EA) and draft finding of no significant impact for siting 500 turbines in the Chokecherry and Sierra Madre Wind Energy Project.

Electric bus maker takes on oil

Source: Camille von Kaenel, E&E reporter • Posted: Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Ryan Popple jokes that his first job out of college was in transportation, serving as a U.S. Army officer dealing with tanks in Iraq. As the 38-year-old CEO and president of electric bus manufacturer Proterra Inc., Popple is still in transportation. But now he’s trying to reduce the country’s dependence on oil and slow global warming by developing a small but growing sector of the market: electric buses.

Comment: The Block Island Offshore Wind Project is Just the Beginning

Source: By Rob Sargent, Huffington Post • Posted: Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Looking across the calm, smooth Atlantic waters from the docks of the small island town of New Shoreham, Rhode Island, it may be hard to tell, but preparations are well underway for the nation’s first offshore wind farm to begin operating here before the year ends. Last fall, wind developers laid five foundations for the turbines that will spin in the Atlantic Ocean, three miles southeast of Block Island and east of Long Island. Last week, officials held the latest in a series of community meetings to discuss the action expected in the months ahead. At the moment, the focus is preparing the way for the 20-mile cable that will distribute power from the DeepWater Wind turbines to the mainland.

Whole Foods Plans 100 Rooftop Solar Systems

Source: By DIANE CARDWELL, New York Times • Posted: Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Things at Whole Foods are about to get even greener. The grocery chain plans to install as many as 100 rooftop solar systems, mainly through the power provider NRG Energy, on nearly a quarter of its stores and distribution centers, the companies said on Tuesday. SolarCity will also provide systems for the grocer, which could expand the rooftop solar program as the installations proceed.

Highly touted $2.2B merger deal falls apart

Source: Christa Marshall, E&E reporter • Posted: Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

In a statement on the termination, rooftop installer Vivint said SunEdison’s failure to “consummate the merger” according to the agreement’s original terms constituted “a willful breach.” After delivering a letter to SunEdison, the company said it would seek all legal remedies available. SunEdison did not immediately respond to requests for comment. The $2.2 billion deal announced last year came under fire from investors. MarketWatch reported, for example, that banks like Goldman Sachs Group Inc. stalled at providing loans to fund the acquisition after SunEdison did not provide timely financial statements.

Senate inches toward deal on energy, Flint

Source: Geof Koss, E&E reporter • Posted: Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Senators were working yesterday afternoon to resolve the lone objection to an agreement to schedule votes on energy reform legislation and a separate measure to help Flint, Mich., cope with its drinking water crisis. Should talks bear fruit, Senate Majority Whip John Cornyn (R-Texas) told reporters, the energy bill, S. 2012, could return to the floor later this week or next week.

Dems introduce resolution pushing renewable energy

Source: Amanda Reilly, E&E reporter • Posted: Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

House and Senate Democrats introduced a bicameral resolution today to promote the goal of moving the country away from fossil fuels and to renewable energy. More than 100 House members and 30 senators — led by Sen. Ben Cardin (D-Md.) and Reps. John Delaney (D-Md.) and Ben Ray Luján (D-N.M.) — are backing the sense-of-Congress resolution. It says that climate change will have a “devastating impact” on the U.S. economy and that the United States should strive to achieve 50 percent renewable energy by 2030.

Moniz hears rising skepticism about Mission Innovation

Source: Pola Lem, E&E reporter • Posted: Tuesday, March 8th, 2016

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz sought to stabilize support behind a key funding program for clean energy research yesterday as he appeared before increasingly skeptical Republican lawmakers. Moniz defended Mission Innovation, a 20-nation initiative set during the Paris climate agreement, against criticism about its goal to double clean energy investment in the United States over the next five years.