News

Keeping Realistic Expectations About Wind Energy

Source: Michael Harper for redOrbit.com • Posted: Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

According to new research from the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the notion that wind energy presents an unending supply of power might be a bit misleading. While there may be no end to breezes and gusts, the way we harness them could be counterproductive, according to applied physicist David Keith. His latest research, which applies mesoscale atmospheric modeling, finds large-scale wind farms will not be as effective as previously thought. His conclusions have now been published in the journal Environmental Research Letters.

Bipartisan group of former officials, lawmakers say warming is a security issue

Source: Jean Chemnick, E&E reporter • Posted: Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Former Cabinet officials and lawmakers from both parties are among the 37 signers of an open letter released today that highlights the potential impact of climate change on geopolitical stability and U.S. national security. Former Sens. Richard Lugar (R-Ind.) and Joseph Lieberman (I-Conn.) were among those calling on their former colleagues in the Partnership for a Secure America letter to “support American security and global stability by addressing the risks of climate change in vulnerable nations.”

Study: Wind power’s role overestimated

Source: UPI • Posted: Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

The global generating capacity of wind farms has been overestimated and the world may not have access to as much wind power as thought, U.S. researchers say. “People have often thought there’s no upper bound for wind power — that it’s one of the most scalable power sources,” Harvard University applied physicist David Keith says.

No fossil projects in 1,200 MW that came online last month — FERC

Source: Hannah Northey, E&E reporter • Posted: Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

Solar panels, windmills and biomass facilities made up all the new generation that came online last month, compared to fossil-heavy contributions in January 2012, according to a new federal report. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission released its monthly infrastructure update that found more than 1,000 megawatts of renewable energy went into operation in January. The findings are based on data from Ventyx Global LLC. In comparison, coal- and gas-fired plants made up the bulk of new generation in January 2012, with lesser contributions from wind and solar facilities, according to the report.

NRDC outlines how states can spur project development

Source: Michelle Merlin, E&E reporter • Posted: Tuesday, February 26th, 2013

An environmental group released a report today promoting offshore wind energy as a smart investment for coastal states. The Natural Resources Defense Council report faults the United States for failing to provide incentives to develop offshore wind.

Maryland House passes wind energy bill

Source: By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun • Posted: Monday, February 25th, 2013

Over the objections of Republican lawmakers, the House of Delegates on Friday approved Gov. Martin O’Malley’s bill to create incentives for development of a wind energy project off the coast of Ocean City.

Interest in wind energy on rise, experts say

Source: By Amanda Dolasinski, Staff Reporter, Tribune-Review • Posted: Monday, February 25th, 2013

Electricity generated by wind farms powered more than 350,000 Pennsylvania homes last year, and that number is expected to grow. “There’s demand,” said Titus North, executive director of Squirrel Hill-based Citizen Power.

Cape Wind: Regulation, Litigation And The Struggle To Develop Offshore Wind Power In The U.S.

Source: Tom Zeller Jr., Huffington Post • Posted: Monday, February 25th, 2013

In 2001, Jim Gordon, a well-heeled developer of natural gas plants in New England, took up a long-discussed but never-pursued idea that advocates said would usher in a new era of clean energy in America: an ocean-based wind farm off the shores of Cape Cod. The advantages of the site seemed plain: Relentless, hard-driving winds, shallow shoals several miles offshore on which to anchor large turbines, and, perhaps most importantly, a left-leaning population inclined to support what was already viewed at the time as an overdue migration away from dirtier sources of electricity.

Proposed wind farm off Atlantic City coast stirs debate over costs

Source: Andrew Maykuth, Inquirer Staff Writer • Posted: Monday, February 25th, 2013

How many tourists would travel to Atlantic City to view the nation’s first offshore wind farm? Fishermen’s Energy, which has proposed building five giant turbines about 2.8 miles off the resort city’s beaches, estimates 4.5 million people a year would visit the site, according to a consultant’s report that recommends the state should turn down the project because it is too costly.

Governor Kitzhaber’s American Wind Energy Association Speech, Portland, February 19, 2013

Source: John Kitzhaber • Posted: Monday, February 25th, 2013

Energy and climate are THE challenges of our time – both globally and here in the Pacific Northwest – and no set of challenges will have a greater impact on our nation’s economy, environment and quality of life in coming decades. Indeed, no other issues have bigger implications for the planet and coming generations. The central question is whether we will shape our energy future through intentional policy, investment and development, or whether it will shape us. Answering this question is urgent, because the toll of our fossil fuel dependence is rising fast. We are struggling to make the complicated transition from 20th century energy infrastructure to new business models that can unleash the job-creation potential of low-carbon energy innovation.