News

Trump Considering Fracking Mogul Harold Hamm as Energy Secretary-Sources

Source: By Richard Valdmanis, Reuters • Posted: Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is considering nominating Oklahoma oil and gas mogul Harold Hamm as energy secretary if elected to the White House on Nov. 8, according to four sources close to Trump’s campaign. The chief executive of Continental Resources would be the first U.S. energy secretary drawn directly from the oil and gas industry since the cabinet position was created in 1977, a move that would jolt environmental advocates but bolster Trump’s pro-drilling energy platform.

GOP platform, which calls coal ‘clean’, would reverse decades of U.S. energy and climate policy

Source: By Steven Mufson, Washington Post • Posted: Thursday, July 21st, 2016

The Republican Party platform adopted Monday night would bring a total about-face on U.S. energy and climate policy, declaring that the priority placed on combating climate change under President Obama “the triumph of extremism over common sense, and Congress must stop it.” The GOP platform calls coal “clean,” pledges to reverse a Supreme Court ruling on the scope of the Clean Air Act, seeks to open vast amounts of federally protected public lands and waters to oil, gas and coal exploitation, rejects the Paris climate accord and Obama’s Clean Power Plan, and opposes a carbon tax. It takes aim at “environmental extremists” and calls the environmental movement “a self-serving elite.”

Rooftop, community solar see big jumps in 2015 — report

Source: Christa Marshall, E&E reporter • Posted: Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Rooftop solar jumped 50 percent last year, the number of active community solar programs spiked 80 percent, and 27 state legislatures or utility commissions took up net-metering reform in 2015 as debates raged about how much to compensate homeowners for excess power sent to the grid. Those were some of the chief conclusions from the Smart Electric Power Alliance’s solar market snapshot, which surveys hundreds of utilities about current trends in the industry. The group, which recently changed its name from Solar Electric Power Association, said about 350 utilities participated this year, a 20 percent increase from the prior year.

LIPA delays Deepwater decision

Source: By ReNews • Posted: Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Deepwater Wind’s proposed 90MW offshore wind farm in New York has been put into a temporary holding pattern. Officials at the Long Island Power Authority have reportedly delayed a vote on whether to offer the 15-turbine South Fork project a route to market, pending a new state-wide offshore wind plan.

Omaha Public Power District looking for up to 400 MW of renewables

Source: By Matthew Bandy, SNL • Posted: Thursday, July 21st, 2016

Nebraska utility the Omaha Public Power District is looking for bidders to provide the utility between 1 MW and 400 MW of renewable power capacity, according to a request for proposals released by OPPD July 18. The RFP would lead to a doubling of the utility’s level of renewable power. As of the end of 2015, OPPD had 416.5 MW of wind and landfill gas capacity, according to a company fact sheet.

Bipartisanship may mean never having to say ‘climate change’

Source: Jennifer Yachnin, E&E reporter • Posted: Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

Those who want to generate support from conservative voters for climate change policies might want to start by omitting the words “climate change” from their pitch. That’s the idea being embraced by some conservative activists as they look to grow the number of Republicans who will back policies to address rising emissions, reduce pollution or grow clean energy. “Get away from this phrase ‘climate change.’ It alienates,” Cella Energy Chairman Jay Lifton said yesterday at a forum on the sidelines of the Republican National Convention organized by the Environmental Defense Fund’s Defend Our Future campaign and Bloomberg Government. “You’re trying to separate people when you use that phrase.”

Platform would hand regs to states, turn EPA into commission

Source: Geof Koss, E&E reporter • Posted: Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

The 2016 Republican platform that party leaders adopted here yesterday envisions a reorganization of U.S. EPA into an independent commission, with primary regulatory authority over the environment handed to state governments. The 66-page document, formally approved on the first day of the Republican National Convention, echoes many familiar GOP themes on energy from recent years, including opening more public lands to production, easing federal regulations and reforming key environmental statutes.

How Renewable Energy Is Blowing Climate Change Efforts Off Course

Source: Eduardo Porter, New York Times • Posted: Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

“The issue is, how do we decarbonize the electricity sector, while keeping the lights on, keeping costs low and avoiding unintended consequences that could make emissions increase?” said Jan Mazurek, who runs the clean power campaign at the environmental advocacy group ClimateWorks. Addressing those challenges will require a more subtle approach than just attaching more renewables to the grid.

Fighting Obama’s Climate Plan, but Quietly Preparing to Comply

Source: By CORAL DAVENPORT, New York Times • Posted: Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

Matt Mead, the governor of Wyoming, the nation’s leading coal-producing state, fiercely opposes President Obama’s climate change regulations, which could shutter hundreds of coal plants and deeply wound his state, one of 27 that are suing to block the plan. Nevertheless, Mr. Mead, a Republican, has ordered his top environmental officials to prepare to comply with the president’s effort, known as the Clean Power Plan — to prepare for a future in which Mr. Obama’s climate change rules prevail and the country’s coal market is nearly frozen. Wyoming is one of at least 20 states that are moving forward with efforts to comply with the rules or to analyze alternative plans. Several of these states are also suing to stop the rules, according to experts who track state climate change policy.

Feds say automakers can hit 2025 fuel economy standards

Source: Umair Irfan, E&E reporter • Posted: Wednesday, July 20th, 2016

U.S. automakers can still hit aggressive fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions targets, contrary to some concerns from the industry, state and federal agencies said yesterday. A draft report by U.S. EPA, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the California Air Resources Board shows that manufacturers are on track to reach an average fuel economy ranging between 50 and 52.6 mpg across their fleets by 2025.